Tanzu

Shut down vSphere with Tanzu

Shut down vSphere with Tanzu. A look at the documentation, procedure, and steps needed to shutdown vSphere with Tanzu

As with all VMware environments with various solutions layered on top of the core vSphere infrastructure, there is an order of operations. This order of operations also applies to shutdown procedure for the SDDC when you are using vSphere with Tanzu. What is that order of operations? Let’s look at how to shut down vSphere with Tanzu and see how this is accomplished.

Shut down vSphere with Tanzu

In an SDDC deployed according to VMware Validated Design, in addition to the management domain you deploy a single workload domain. If you deployed a vSphere with Tanzu workload domain, you start shutting down the SDDC management components in the vSphere with Tanzu workload domain before shutting down the SDDC components in the management domain.

vSphere with Tanzu Kubernetes environment
vSphere with Tanzu Kubernetes environment

When shutdown in the proper order, you keep the components operational by maintaining the necessary infrastructure, networking, and management services before shutdown. Note the following table below, taken from the official KB from VMware on the Shutdown order for a vSphere with Tanzu cluster.

Shutdown OrderSDDC Component
1vCenter Server
2Supervisor Control Plane virtual machines
3Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster control plane virtual machines
4Tanzu Kubernetes Cluster worker virtual machines
5Harbor virtual machines
6vSphere Cluster Services virtual machines
7NSX-T Edge nodes
8NSX-T Managers
9vSAN and ESXi hosts
Shutdown order of vSphere with Tanzu and other VMware solutions in the SDDC

As a disclaimer, the following was tested in my home lab environment and not a production environment. If you have any questions regarding specific guidance as recommended by VMware, be sure to place a support request for official guidance and support.

Shutdown the Kubernetes services on the vCenter Server

To begin with, you shutdown the vSphere with Tanzu workload domain components. To do this, you stop the Kubernetes services on the vCenter Server. Login into your vCenter Server and stop the Kubernetes services by running the command:

vmon-cli -k wcp

After the services stop, you can check the services.

vmon-cli -s wcp
Stopping the Kubernetes services on the vCenter Server
Stopping the Kubernetes services on the vCenter Server

Once you stop the Kubernetes services, your visibility in the vSphere Client to the TKC namespaces goes away:

After stopping the Kubernetes services in vCenter Server
After stopping the Kubernetes services in vCenter Server

Also, if you navigate to the Workload Management section in your vSphere Client, you will see this error. This just means the Kubernetes services are stopped on the vCenter Server.

Navigating to workload management in the vSphere Client UI
Navigating to workload management in the vSphere Client UI

If you notice, you don’t have a shutdown option for the SupervisorControlPlane VMs that are running in inventory. For the Supervisor VMs and the workload VMs, we have to shut those down from the ESXi host directly.

Note the shutdown option is greyed out in the vSphere Client
Note the shutdown option is greyed out in the vSphere Client

First, I am shutting down the tkc cluster control plane VMs.

Shutdown the TKC control pane VMs on each respective ESXi host
Shutdown the TKC control pane VMs on each respective ESXi host

Next, I shutdown the Supervisor control plane VM.

Shutdown the supervisor control plane VMs on each ESXi host
Shutdown the supervisor control plane VMs on each ESXi host

Next, shutdown or reboot your hosts for maintenance or other tasks. After bringing these back online, you should see your TKC services come back online without issue. Note below, everything is running once again.

After rebooting or powering back on your TKC cluster everything comes back online
After rebooting or powering back on your TKC cluster everything comes back online

Wrapping Up

Hopefully this walkthrough shows some of the steps needed to shutdown your TKC cluster you have running in the proper order. Note, there may be extra steps needed than what I have shown in the post. I am still playing around with TKC operations in the nested lab and will report any changes back to the post. Also, please comment if you have seen additional requirements or issues.

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Brandon Lee

Brandon Lee is the Senior Writer, Engineer and owner at Virtualizationhowto.com and has over two decades of experience in Information Technology. Having worked for numerous Fortune 500 companies as well as in various industries, Brandon has extensive experience in various IT segments and is a strong advocate for open source technologies. Brandon holds many industry certifications, loves the outdoors and spending time with family.

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