Windows

How to map a network drive using the IPV6 address in Windows

Learn How to map a network drive using the IPV6 address in Windows

Highlights

  • The address that we have listed after the rules are applied is the address that you can use to map a network drive or navigate to a UNC path for instance.
  • So in case you were wondering why we haven’t rapidly adopted IP version 6, then you may not have tried to map a network drive to an IPV6 address as of yet.
  • After you find the actual IPV6 address, follow the below procedure to map a drive or connect via UNC to the ipv6 address and share.

So in case you were wondering why we haven’t rapidly adopted IP version 6, then you may not have tried to map a network drive to an IPV6 address as of yet.  All jokes aside, there are many complexities of “real world” everyday things that admins and users need to be able to quickly and efficiently do that are still kind of difficult in IPV6.  Mapping a drive as we mention above can be pretty interesting.

How do we do it

The first step is actually getting the IPV6 address that you are wanting to connect to.  This can be achieved using the ipconfig command

ipv61

After you find the actual IPV6 address, follow the below procedure to map a drive or connect via UNC to the ipv6 address and share.

Rules:

  • Replace colons “:” with dashes “-“
  • Replace percent sign “%” with the letter “s”.  Keep in mind, this is only used if you are using a link-local IPv6 address.  Global Unicast and Unique Local addresses don’t require interface identifiers.
  • Add the following to the end of the IPv6 address .ipv6-literal.net  – this is post interface ID, if required

So how does this all look when we are finished adding and changing what we need?  Take a look at the examples below

  • fe80::22a:b2ff:fe22:2bb2%12  – this is what it looks like in ipconfig
  • fe80-22a-b2ff-fe22-2bb2s12.ipv6-literal.net – this is the address that we come up with once we use the rules above to translate it.

The address that we have listed after the rules are applied is the address that you can use to map a network drive or navigate to a UNC path for instance:

\fe80-22a-b2ff-fe22-2bb2s12.ipv6-literal.net\c$

Final Thoughts

One thing for certain is that IPv6 in Windows is definitely painful as far as mapped drives are concerned.  You can see why many are slow to adopt the new standard, when IPv4 is just simply easier to navigate and remember what you need to in order to get where you are going.  However, it adoption is inevitable, so skills such as the above are going to be required for admins to get a good handle on.

Subscribe to VirtualizationHowto via Email 🔔

Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Brandon Lee

Brandon Lee is the Senior Writer, Engineer and owner at Virtualizationhowto.com and has over two decades of experience in Information Technology. Having worked for numerous Fortune 500 companies as well as in various industries, Brandon has extensive experience in various IT segments and is a strong advocate for open source technologies. Brandon holds many industry certifications, loves the outdoors and spending time with family.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.